Autumn- A Feast for the Senses Assignment Gallery

We have had a great response to October’s photographic challenge – to capture the essence of fall with a camera. Recognizing that attempting to bring all of one’s senses together in a single moment is an exercise in presence, the results produced by everybody did indeed reflect a unique and individual interpretation of the assignment. Under each person’s name is their response to the questions we asked:

1. Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?

2. What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?

3. Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?

The responses to these questions are every bit as intriguing and thoughtful as the images. We appreciate the effort and are quite impressed with this month’s submissions. Congratulations to everyone who contibuted. To our readers, we hope that you enjoy the work…and the season!  Click on each image to see them larger.

And think about participating in next month’s assignment!

Donald L. Trask

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
Color. The radiant autumn color of the aspens in the crisp morning air was breathtaking.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
Doing my best to really capture the colors – plus just getting there on foot.

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
Hope Valley aspens. The scene has stayed in my mind for three years.

Jennifer Doscher

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
One of my favorite characteristics of fall is the distinct chill in the air that makes one want to snuggle into a cozy jacket and hat and meander through falling leaves.  The frost on these fallen, fragile leaves reminds me of this sensation each time I look at these images.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
I frequently reminded myself to slow down, to regard each element in view before releasing the shutter.  I eventually found “the zone” and noticed the light, shadow, texture and compositional weight, all working in tandem to offer a sense of juxtaposition between the compositional elements.
 

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
I most enjoy the image entitled “Half Frozen Leaf.”  I was taken by Nature’s artistic gesture of frost on one complete half of the leaf.  I also enjoy the contrast in elements within the image, the smooth surface and fragility of the leaf paired with the heavy and distinct texture of the frost crystals and leaf’s jagged edge, the lightness of the leaf on the grass but the depth of shadow of the grass above the leaf, the light and dark, smooth lines and jagged…I chose a monotone filter effect to better convey these more subtle contrasts (instead of letting the color differences overwhelm.)

Vicarious Moments Photography
http://vicariousmomentsphotography.blogspot.com

Gina Dawson

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
Thirst.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
Evoking the senses visually.
 

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
This one because of the richness and juiciness.

Mel Mann

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
I wanted to show the quality of autumn light, the warmth of it on fall colors.  I also wanted to offer a sense of wind moving through different fall foliages.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
Showing something obviously “fall” that would get beyond the grand landscape image.
 

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
My favorite here is the leaf caught in the web, dangling in the wind with the sunlight behind it.

http://melmannphoto.wordpress.com/

Cheryl MacLean

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?Image 1 (“Joy”) – fall foliage is not only beautiful – it’s wonderful to play in!  I wanted to capture the joy a child experiences when playing in a yard full of leaves.  The leaves touch all our sense – they are bright reds and oranges, they can be supple in texture, they have that earthy smell, they float and twist in the air… a child experiences all this with joy.
Image 2 (“The Hayride”) – it seemed fitting to me to create this hayride scene in a soft focus, like an impressionist painting. There is just enough information to understand the story.  I wanted to capture the feeling of family time, togetherness, and enjoying autumn as a community.
Image 3 (“Pumpkin Harvest”) – pumpkins are wonderful subjects on their own, but I wanted something with more of a story and opted for these trailer loads of pumpkins – in muted tones for a different look.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
Often the light was challenging, as I was trying to photograph in bright mid-day sun.
 

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
“Joy” is my favorite.  I love the emotion in the picture and the memory of where we were and how fun it was to spend time just capturing my daughter frolic in the leaves.

Steve Fletcher

This was a great assignment as fall is my favorite time of year.  The colors are always great to photograph but it was challenging thinking about what most invokes the emotion I associate with fall.  Certainly nature’s paintbrush around a mountain lake as well as the fog captures both the colors and briskness of fall.   The eerie bugle of an elk captures the sound of fall and also reminds me of hunting season in Montana.  However, the photo of the leaves with a sort of grayish, red color palette reminds me the most of fall in Montana simply because I don’t see it any other time of year and it seems to communicate that briskness, color, and emotions I associate with this time of year.

David P. McMasters

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
A sense of touch- remembering going to the swimming hole on a hot summer day.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
Trying to make the photo about more than fall color.

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
The first one.  The simplicity of the scene with mist coming off the creek and the sun not hitting the water yet.

Scott Fuller

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
I often try to look for something other than just an image in my photos.  It’s not easy.  Photography is literally “Light Writing”.  A picture that invokes other sensual experiences in the viewer is relying on the memory and experiences of that person to make the connection there.  It is contectural for the photographer.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
The most challenging thing is finding a subject and light to make an appealing image.  Identifying a common thread for everyone, and putting it into an apealling scene takes a lot of exceptional vision and empathy, something I don’t have as much of as I would like.  In the pictures I submitted, I was in the right time and place for each of them; an ephemeral moment in time.

The shot of the grove was taken on a windy, cold, mostly cloudy day.  A small patch of sunlight lit the aspens on the hillside for only 30 seconds.  I was lucky to be there at that time.  I sense the cool water in the river, the sound of it rushing over the stones, and the warmth of the sun on the aspens.

The shot of the single tree was taken in a meadow where the cloud tops and the sunlight combined to provide very unusual lighting. It enveloped everything and isolated everything from its surroundings. I took many shots here and I could have included any of them. I hope the viewer senses the cool fog, and the isolation of the tree.  I’ve been back to this meadow many times and have never encountered this phenomenon again.

The shot of the two leaves on the granite with red lichens was taken as I found it on the forest floor while walking among the changing aspens.  The tectures and colors are in contrast; the smooth yellow leaves, the crinkly red lichens, and the rough gray and white granite. A breeze, snow or more fallen leaves would change the scene to something else.  I was happy to find it just as it was.

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
My favorite shot was of the single tree in the foggy, sunlit meadow.  It is unlikely that I will ever again be able to duplicate the conditions that  created it.

Genevieve Fix

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
I attempted to bring the sense of chill of the first autumn frost in two of the pictures and the warmth of fall colors in the foliage picture.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
The most challenging experience was to translate what I wanted the viewer to feel into images.

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
My favorite image is the leaves on the grass because of the contrast of colors and the composition.

Lauren Riker

Beyond “seeing” the scene, what other senses did you attempt to bring to your images?
The photos that I selected were ones that provoked emotions of fall sensory images: the leaf immersed in the water creating an iridescence to the the texture of the leaf and layers of color from the other natural items surrounding it from nature, the sense of joy, wonderment and excitement as images of past memories of colored leaves in many spectrums fill our minds.  The maple leaves overlapping in a close-up evoke beauty, a true treasure , and finally the portrayal of fall upon us with the scene of Lake Washington in the morning dawn of the crispness of the air, texture on the water, reflection of light on the buildings, boats and inner harbors, conveying the emotion of transformance, anticipation and majestic beauty.

What was the most challenging experience of this exercise?
The most challenging was deciding what to photograph. There are so many great scenes of fall: pumpkins, final fall flowers reaching to the sky on the last day of the Greek blue sky, people in the parks.  It was hard to decide, but I ended up selecting the images that are attached for my selections.

Which of your images submitted is your favorite and why?
At first I was going to state the single leaf in the puddle, as this was with my film camera, Canon Elan 7N, and I still feel that film captures a different texture and profile over digital, but when perusing the images again, I like my view of Lake Washington taken with my Canon 50D, as the pallete of fall colors is present in the early morning display of color, the water feels like a canvas of a watercolor painter, and the reflection of light is present in many forms from the buildings, boats and lake and brings forth many emotions, sensory delights and inspires you to go back to that scene again yearning for more as a photographer.

 

3 thoughts on “Autumn- A Feast for the Senses Assignment Gallery

Kate Cooper

David P McMasters found a great spot, these are lovely, I also like the first shot. Is that third image HDR?

Coretta Bonardi

Terrific post however , I was wondering if you could write a litte more on this topic? I’d be very grateful if you could elaborate a little bit further. Thank you!

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